Julio Le Parc

Julio Le Parc (b. 1928) took night classes at the School of Fine Arts in the 1940s, while working by day, later becoming involved in Argentina’s avant-garde artistic movements: Arte Concreto-Invención and Spazialismo, inspired by Lucio Fontana, one of his professors at the fine arts school.

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Julio Le Parc: Continuel lumière cylindre (1962)

In Continuel lumière cylindre (Continuous light cylinder) (1962) one enters a completely darkened room. A projector throws a ray of artificial light that is broken up by rotating plastic elements placed on the projector’s lens. Continuously fractured, the light bounces onto an enormous circle of mirrors, creating enchanting reflections. Visitors interact with their reflection as they move about the room, establishing an individual dialogue with the artwork as their perceptions change with their movement.

 
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                    [description] => Julio Le Parc, Continuel lumière cylinder, 1962. Metal, light, wood, motor and plastic 252 diameter x 37.5 cm ; 41.5 x 30.5 x 36 cm. Courtesy the artist.
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Julio Le Parc (b. 1928) took night classes at the School of Fine Arts in the 1940s, while working by day, later becoming involved in Argentina’s avant-garde artistic movements: Arte Concreto-Invención and Spazialismo, inspired by Lucio Fontana, one of his professors at the fine arts school. In 1958 Le Parc entered a contest organized by the French Cultural Services and obtained a fellowship. He moves to Paris where he created GRAV (Groupe de Recherche d’Art Visuel, or Visual Art Research Group), where he continued to experiment with the use of light.

Significant solo exhibitions include Julio Le Parc 1959 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (2018); the first major solo exhibition of Le Parc’s work in the United Kingdom at the Serpentine Galleries in London (2014) and Le Parc’s first solo exhibition at the Howard Wise Gallery, New York (1966). Major retrospectives include Form into Action, Pérez Art Museum Miami (2016); Dusseldorf Kunsthalle (1971) and Museo de Bellas Artes, Caracas (1981).

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teamLab

teamLab (est. 2001) is an interdisciplinary art collective founded in 2001 in Tokyo, whose team includes  several hundred specialists. At the heart of their practice lies the belief that art created using digital technology can bring people together through shared experiences.

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                    [post_content] => For Flowers and People (2020), the teamLab collective has created an elaborate computer program that continuously renders the artwork in real-time. This interactive installation accumulates floral images that never replicate themselves. The cycle of growth and decay inherent in nature occurs as the viewer adjusts their proximity to the screens moving closer to or further away, thus generating either the blossoming or waning of the flowers. This existential regenerative process is emulated in nature as it is in life and art.
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                    [description] => teamLab, Flowers and People – A Whole Year per Hour, 2020. Interactive Digital Work, 12 channels (6 channels x 2 rows), endless. Sound - Hideaki Takahashi. Courtesy ©teamLab, Pace Gallery and Superblue. Photo © Riyadh Art 2021
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teamLab (est. 2001) is an interdisciplinary art collective founded in 2001 in Tokyo, whose team includes several hundred specialists. At the heart of their practice lies the belief that art created using digital technology can bring people together through shared experiences. Their immersive, colorful installations transcend the boundaries between art and science to encourage meaningful interactions with both the work and other people. As we move around the space, our very actions—along with those of other participants—provoke flowers to bloom, waterfalls to change the course of their flow, and butterflies to twirl in the air. We are reminded that there is strength in the collective and are invited to reconnect with the world and marvel at its beauty.

teamLab has two long-term exhibitions in Tokyo: the long-term museum teamLab Planets and the permanent space teamLab Borderless, with several more planned around the world in coming years. teamLab Borderless was the most visited single-artist museum exhibition in the world in its inaugural year, welcoming 2.3 million visitors. Works by teamLab are also featured in the permanent collections of the Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide; the Amos Rex, Helsinki; the Borusan Contemporary Art Collection, Istanbul; the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne; the Asia Society Museum, New York the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco; and the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney.

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James Turrell

James Turrell (b.1943). Beginning his art career in the 1960s, James Turrell’s work is primarily an exploration of light and space. One part meditative and another confounding, Turrell’s works heighten the viewer’s very sense of seeing and place the viewer in a realm of experience.

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James Turrell: Afrum (Pale Pink), 1967

In Afrum (Pale Pink) (1967), a single projector casts a basic geometric form of a pyramid or tetrahedron onto the opposing corner in a darkened room. An optical illusion creates a volume and mass floating untethered in space. A pure and mesmerizing effect overcomes the viewer alone in the room. The installation activates a heightened sensory awareness that promotes discovery: what seems to be a lustrous, suspended cube is actually the conjunction of two flat panels of projected light.
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James Turrell (b.1943). Beginning his art career in the 1960s, James Turrell’s work is primarily an exploration of light and space. By making light the subject of the revelation, Turrell’s work challenges the very nature of how and what is perceived and, in particular, how what is perceived affects and forms the reality lived. One part meditative and another confounding, Turrell’s works heighten the viewer’s very sense of seeing and place the viewer in a realm of experience.

Residing in Flagstaff, Turrell is working on Roden Crater, an artwork of unprecedented scale within a volcanic cinder cone in the Painted Desert region of Northern Arizona. Representing the culmination of the artist’s lifelong research in the field of human visual and psychological perception, Roden Crater is Turrell’s magnum opus. It is a work that, in addition to being a monument to land art, functions as a naked-eye observatory of celestial and planetary events. Turrell’s work has been exhibited in art institutions across the world, including the Guggenheim Museum in New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam; the Israel Museum in Jerusalem; the Kunstmuseum in Wolfsburg; the National Gallery of Art in Canberra; and the Long Museum in Shanghai. Turrell is the recipient of several prestigious awards, including the MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (1984) and the National Medal of Arts (2013).

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Anila Quayyum Agha

Anila Quayyum Agha (b. 1965) is a Pakistani-American artist who works in a cross-disciplinary fashion with mixed media. She creates artwork that explores global politics, cultural multiplicity, mass media, and social and gender roles in our current cultural and global scenario.

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                    [post_content] => In Hidden Diamond — Saffron (2019),  Anila Quayyum Agha designed each side of the suspended cube the same, repeating a symmetrical pattern by combining and adapting different decorative elements from the Alhambra. Suspended and lit from within, the cube casts lace-like, floor-to-ceiling shadows that allude to the richly ornamented public spaces of her youth. These geometric shapes and lines become shadows covering the walls, floor, ceiling, and even visitors. No clear boundary or separation exists. Our moving bodies change the nature of the pattern as one interacts freely, weaving in and out and through its dense silhouette. Agha pushes the dichotomies of public and private, light and shadow, and static and dynamic in her work by relying on the symmetry of geometric design and the interpretation of the cast shadows to transform our surrounding environment completely.
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Anila Quayyum Agha (b. 1965) is a Pakistani-American artist who works in a cross-disciplinary fashion with mixed media. She creates artwork that explores global politics, cultural multiplicity, mass media, and social and gender roles in our current cultural and global scenario. As a result, her artwork is conceptually challenging, producing complicated weaves of thought, artistic action and social experience. Agha is perhaps best known for her immersive, large-scale light installations in which she laser-cuts elaborate patterns into three-dimensional cubes.

Agha’s work has been exhibited in numerous exhibitions including at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Jacksonville, Florida; the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts; Grand Rapids Art Museum, Michigan; Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio; National Sculpture Museum, Valladolid, Spain; and Dallas Contemporary Art Museum, Texas. Major awards include the Efroymson Contemporary Arts Fellowship, ArtPrize (Juried and Public Vote Grand Prize 2014), Creative Renewal Fellowship and DeHaan Artist of Distinction (Indy Arts Council), Research Scholar Award (Indiana University), Schiele Prize (Cincinnati Art Museum) and the 2019 Painters and Sculptors Grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation. For the 2019 Venice Biennale, Agha was included in the collateral event She Persists. Her work has been collected by institutions and private collectors nationally and internationally.

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Mary Corse

Mary Corse (b. 1945) investigates materiality, abstraction, and perception through the subtly gestural and precisely geometric paintings that she has made over her fifty-year career.

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Mary Corse: Untitled (Electric Light), 2019

Untitled (Electric Light) (2019) contains tubes filled with argon gas that ionizes when a generator—concealed in a false wall—is activated. The bulbs emit a blue-tinged glow that pulses in time with the accompanying hum. Rather than an altered perceptual state, the viewer is directly confronted with a physical object whose menacing noise disrupts their understanding of what an artwork can be.
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Mary Corse (b. 1945) investigates materiality, abstraction and perception through the subtly gestural and precisely geometric paintings that she has made over her fifty-year career. Earning a BFA in 1968 from Chouinard Art Institute, Los Angeles, Corse developed her initial work during the emergence of the Light and Space movement in Southern California. Throughout the 1960s, she experimented with unconventional media and supports, producing shaped canvases, works with plexiglass and illuminated boxes. Corse’s art emphasizes the abstract nature of human perception, expanding beyond the visual to include subtleties of feeling and awareness.

Corse’s work has been included in historically significant group exhibitions, including Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents in L.A., Painting and Sculpture, 1950-1970 at The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (2011); and Phenomenal: California Light and Space at the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego (2011). In 2018, the Whitney Museum of American Art opened the solo exhibition A Survey in Light. Her work is held in numerous public collections worldwide, including Fondation Beyeler, Basel; The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; The Menil Collection, Houston; The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others.

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Robert Irwin

Robert Irwin (b. 1928) is a pioneering figure of the Los Angeles-based Light and Space movement of the 1960s. Beginning his career as a painter, Irwin later began exploring perception and light with his acrylic columns and discs.

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Robert Irwin: Buzy Body, 2018

Buzy Body (2018) effectively dissolves the perceived border between object and environment. Composed from unlit 15.24cm fluorescent lights mounted to fixtures and installed in vertical rows directly on the wall, the glass tubes are covered in layers of opulently colored translucent gels and thin strips of electrical tape. Each light fixture in     Irwin’s sculpture contains one or two unlit bulbs—or no bulb at all—while alternating gaps of an “empty” wall are painted in subtle shades of gray, producing a sense of uncertainty about what is tactile and what is merely optical. As the shadowed, painted and reflected intervals of space reverberate in the viewer’s visual field, the wall itself enters the composition, destabilizing any sense of figure and ground. Although unlit, the bulbs in the Unlights series are therefore never “off.” Their optically rich surfaces serve as energetic loci for heightening the sensory possibilities of the human body.
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Robert Irwin (b. 1928) is a pioneering figure of the Los Angeles-based Light and Space movement of the 1960s. Beginning his career as a painter, Irwin later began exploring perception and light with his acrylic columns and discs. In 1969, he gave up his studio and began what he termed a conditional practice, working with the effects of light through subtle interventions in space and architecture. Irwin employs a wide range of media—including fluorescent lights, fabric scrims, colored and tinted gels, paint, wire, acrylic and glass—in the creation of site-conditioned works that respond to the context of their specific environments.

Irwin is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including a five-year MacArthur Fellowship (1984–89) and a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship (1976). Irwin has had more than eighty solo exhibitions at institutions including Dia Art Foundation, New York (2015, 1998); the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2013, 1977); Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2009, 1976); Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego (2007, 1997); The Museum of Modern Art, New York (1970). Irwin has been represented by Pace since 1966 and the gallery has held eighteen solo artist exhibitions of his work.

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Leo Villareal

Leo Villareal (b. 1967) uses LED lights to create complex, rhythmic artworks on scales ranging from stand-alone sculptures to public infrastructure projects. Villareal is known for illuminating entire façades and bridges across the world, subtly reflecting their use, environment, and history through speed, pattern, and color.

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                    [post_content] => Corona (2018) comprises three LED screens containing nearly 25 million pixels, whereas the LED panels feature a drastically reduced pixel pitch. The artist’s use of the triptych underscores the importance of art historical precedent in his work, alluding to a format associated initially with Renaissance altarpieces. Corona explores how the traditional form of the triptych takes on new meaning in a contemporary digital age in which screens proliferate around us in increasingly immersive configurations. Villareal's mesmerizing patterns expand upon the artist’s fascination with visualizing systems—both their operation and disruption through the distinctive properties of light. The resulting forms move, change, interact, and ultimately grow into complex organisms inspired by the work of English mathematician John Conway. The animated particles of the display rhythmically pulse in radial choreographies that open outward toward the sublime vastness of the universe, the enigmatic world of subatomic particles, and the fundamental properties of living systems. 
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Leo Villareal (b. 1967) uses LED lights to create complex, rhythmic artworks on scales ranging from stand-alone sculptures to public infrastructure projects. Villareal is known for illuminating entire façades and bridges across the world, subtly reflecting their use, environment, and history through speed, pattern and color. The resulting compositions are unique, generated by custom software that randomly modifies the frequency and intensity of the lights through sequencing. The artist has called his works “digital campfires,” alluding to both their enveloping quality and mesmerizing effect.

Since 2019, Villareal has been working on Illuminated River, his largest project to date. The public light installation, unveiled in stages through 2022, spans 14 bridges in central London, from Albert Bridge in West London to Tower Bridge in the East, unifying them in a single artwork and defining them as a sculptural and symbolic link across the capital. Prior to this, Villareal created a temporary light installation on the Bay Bridge in San Francisco (2013), which became a permanent fixture in the city following a public petition in 2016. Villareal’s work is featured in the permanent collections of the Brooklyn Museum of Art, New York; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, among others.

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Keith Sonnier

Keith Sonnier (1941 – 2020) radically reinvented sculpture in the late 1960s. Employing unusual materials that had never before been used, Sonnier called all previous conceptions of sculpture into question. In 1968, he began working with neon, which quickly became a defining element of his work.

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Keith Sonnier: Neon Wrapping Incandescent V, 1970

Argon and neon tubes, porcelain fixtures, incandescent bulbs, light switch, transformer, and electrical wire.
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                    [description] => Keith Sonnier American, b. 1941-2020. Neon Wrapping Incandescent V, 1970 Argon and neon tubes, porcelain fixtures, incandescent bulbs, light switch, transformer, and electrical wire 133.4 x 315 x 22.9 cm. Courtesy the artist, Pace Gallery and Superblue © 2021 Keith Sonnier / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Photograph by Kerry Ryan McFate
                )

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Keith Sonnier (b. 1941) emerged in the 1960s among a generation of artists who inherited the lessons of Minimalism and began using less rigid forms in their work. Sonnier earned his MFA from Rutgers University in 1966, studying with Robert Morris and Robert Watts. When he began exhibiting in New York in the mid-1960s, he was grouped with New York Postminimalist and process artists. Among the first artists to employ neon as a medium, Sonnier’s investigations of light, color, space, structure and materials have sustained his practice since the 1960s.

Sonnier has been the subject of over 150 solo artist exhibitions including a retrospective held at the Alexandria Museum of Art, Louisiana (1987). Featured in over 360 group exhibitions, Sonnier’s work has been included in the Venice Biennale (1982,1972), the Whitney Biennial (1977, 1973); Biennale de Paris (1975); and International Biennial Exhibition of Prints, Tokyo (1974). Sonnier’s work is held in over fifty public collections throughout the United States and abroad.

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Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama (b.1929) is an avant-garde artist and novelist. She has created fantastical paintings using polka dots and nets as motifs since childhood. Working energetically on new art pieces, she plays an active part in artistic activities, often traveling the world for exhibitions of her works.

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                    [post_date] => 2021-02-04 09:59:25
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                    [post_content] => Infinity Mirror Room — Brilliance of the Souls (2014) functions on multiple levels, exploiting fragmentation, refraction, and reflection to immerse the viewer in a variegated cosmos. Stepping across its threshold, the viewer takes a dreamlike walk through an alternate universe where mirrored images create an infinite visual field of multi-colored twinkling lights and shimmering water. At once theatrical and meditative, intimate, and interactive, this work offers visitors an experience of infinity made tangible.
                    [post_title] => Infinity Mirror Room—Brilliance of Souls, 2014
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                    [description] =>  Yayoi Kusama Infinity Mirror Room - Brilliance of Souls, 2014 Mirror, wooden panel, LED, metal, acrylic panel, water 287 x 415 x 415 cm. Courtesy of Royal Commission for AlUla. Photo © Riyadh Art 2021
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    [artists_detailed_description] => 

Yayoi Kusama (b.1929) is an avant-garde artist and novelist. She has created fantastical paintings using polka dots and nets as motifs since childhood. Kusama went to the United States in 1957, where she showed huge paintings, soft sculptures and environmental art employing mirrors and electric lights. In the latter 1960s, she organized many happenings and engaged in fashion designing as well as film production. Her original works and activities which made a big impact on the art world established her status as an avant-garde artist. Since her return to Japan in 1973, she has continued to show works both in Japan and abroad, and exhibited open-air sculptures in various parts of the world. Working energetically on new art pieces, she plays an active part in artistic activities, often traveling the world for exhibitions of her works.

Prizes and recognition received include Tokyo Honorable Citizenship (2017); the Order of Culture (2016); honorary citizenship of Shinjuku Ward, Tokyo (2012); became a member of American Academy of Arts & Letters 2012); selected as a Person of Cultural Merit (2009); Lifetime Achievement Prize (U.S.A.), the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Rosette, the Praemium Imperiale (2006); Arts et Lettre (Officier) from French Government, Nagano Prefectural Governor’s Commendations (for academic, artistic and cultural merit) (2003); The 50th Education Minister’s Art Encouragement Prize, Foreign Minister’s Commendation (2000) and The Tenth Literary Award for New Writers from the magazine Yasei Jidai (for the novel, The Hustlers Grotto of Christopher Street) (1980).

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Daniel Firman

Daniel Firman (b. 1966) is a French artist based between New York, Istanbul, and Dreux in France. Firman studied at the Beaux-Arts in France, and was immediately fascinated with dance and architecture.

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                    [post_content] => French artist Daniel Firman’s sculptural works explore movement and gesture centered around one’s sense of doing and taking action. Firman’s practice often incorporates dance intimated here in his splayed neon arc, Butterfly (2007), that gracefully unfolds against a wall. The work’s title alludes to a majestic butterfly whose biodiversity is under threat due to our planet’s extreme climatic changes. The chromatic variety of the neon lights signifies the diverse beauty of the Lepidoptera species. In literature and art, butterflies are often portrayed as the essence of nature and are associated with freedom, beauty, and peace. Firman’s decision to root the work to the ground rather than in flight further hints at our own loss should man’s insistence on negative technologies push the butterfly into extinction. Similarly, the fact that the artwork is dependent on technology to experience it acknowledges that the butterfly is a vital element within nature’s food chain that must be saved.
                    [post_title] => Butterfly, 2007
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                    [description] => Daniel Firman, Butterfly, 2007. Neon tubes. 350 x 635 cm. Courtesy the artist and the Farjam Collection. Photo © Riyadh Art 2021
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Daniel Firman (b. 1966) is a French artist based between New York, Istanbul, and Dreux in France. Firman studied at the Beaux-Arts in France, and was immediately fascinated with dance and architecture. He taught on the subject of the body and space at ENSAL National school of Architecture of Lyon from 2004 to 2010.

Firman’s work can be found in many private collections and museum collections. His work has been exhibited at the Venice Biennale and institutions such as Reflex, Amsterdam; Choi & Lager, Cologne; Pilevneli, Istanbul; MSU Broad Museum, Michigan; Ceysson-Bénétière, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Galerie Perrotin, Paris and Palais de Tokyo, Paris.

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Urs Fischer

Urs Fischer (b. 1973) mines the potential of materials — from clay, steel, and paint to bread, dirt, and produce — creating works that disorient and bewilder. 

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                    [post_date] => 2021-02-04 09:51:20
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                    [post_content] => Leo (George & Irmelin) (2019) is a rendering of actor, art collector, and climate change advocate Leonardo DiCaprio depicted in a double portrait with his mother (Irmelin Indenbirken) and father (George DiCaprio).  In a nod to a pre-electric world, the work provides a continual source of natural light from a flame that burns at its own speed. Over the course of the exhibition, the sculpture will increasingly morph into a pile of debris dictated by the wayward laws of physics as it melts and distorts the personages. This exquisite metamorphosis from individuals to a vague representation of reality is a gradual process that evokes the grains of time passing through an hourglass. It stands as an allusion to life flickering for a mere moment in a slow-burn performance. A meditation on time and gravity, life and death, and the implications of a non-electric world, the sculpture captivates viewers with its materiality. 
                    [post_title] => Leo (George and Irmelin), 2019
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                    [description] => Urs Fischer, Leo (George and Irmelin), 2019, Paraffin wax, microcrystalline wax, pigment, stainless steel, and wicks 214.9 x 98.1 x 146.7 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian. Photo © Riyadh Art 2021
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                    [description] => Urs Fischer, Swiss, b. 1973, Leo (George and Irmelin), 2019. Paraffin wax, microcrystalline wax, pigment, stainless steel, and wicks, 214.9 x 98.1 x 146.7 cm. © Urs Fischer, courtesy the artist and Gagosian
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Urs Fischer (b. 1973) mines the potential of materials—from clay, steel, and paint to bread, dirt, and produce—creating works that disorient and bewilder. Through scale distortions, illusion, and the juxtaposition of common objects, his sculptures, paintings, photographs, and large-scale installations explore themes of perception and representation while maintaining a witty irreverence and mordant sense of humor.

Fischer has exhibited extensively internationally, and his work is included in many important public and private collections worldwide. Solo exhibitions include Leo, Gagosian, rue de Ponthieu, Paris (2019); PLAY, Jeffrey Deitch, Los Angeles (2019); soft, Sadie Coles HQ, London (2018); Urs Fischer, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2013); Marguerite de Ponty, New Museum, New York (2009) and more. Fischer lives and works in New York.

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Lara Baladi

Lara Baladi (b.1969) is an internationally recognized Egyptian-Lebanese multi-disciplinary artist, archivist and educator. Her artistic practice spans from photography, video, sculpture to architecture and multi-media installations.

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                    [post_content] => Roba Vecchia (2007) has its genesis in an earlier work of the same name by Egyptian-Lebanese artist Lara Baladi. The parent work is a life-sized kaleidoscope installation in which the viewer is surrounded by a shifting array of the artist’s personal images. Working with the assistance of a computer programmer who created a software program that organized fragments of Baladi’s images, the installation projected the photographic images in elaborate patterns that randomly mutated in an infinite and non-repetitive way. For this wall-hanging version, the artist collected a selection of digital images from her previous installation, repositioning them into a fixed pattern whose geometry references stained glass windows, mandalas, and arabesques to cellular microcosms and the infinite night sky. Known for her constant mining of her digital archives, the iconography presented here becomes merely a reflection of the accumulation and reworking of leftovers in a continuous rewriting of personal history. This piece's surface is further illuminated by the gallery’s lights as they bounce off the polished stainless steel background, offering the experience of a transfixed and abstract two-dimensional work.
                    [post_title] => Roba Vecchia, 2007
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                    [post_modified] => 2021-04-01 09:28:36
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                    [description] => Lara Baladi, Egyptian-Lebanese, b. 1969, Roba Vecchia, The Wheel of Fortune, 2007. Acetate on mirror-polished stainless steel, 153 x 300 cm. The Farjam Collection, Dubai
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                    [description] => Lara Baladi, Egyptian-Lebanese, b. 1969, Roba Vecchia, The Wheel of Fortune, 2007. Acetate on mirror-polished stainless steel, 153 x 300 cm. The Farjam Collection, Dubai
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    [artists_detailed_description] => 

Lara Baladi (b.1969) is an internationally recognized Egyptian-Lebanese multi-disciplinary artist, archivist and educator. Her artistic practice spans from photography, video, sculpture to architecture and multi-media installations. Through a process of investigation into archives and the study of popular culture iconography, while questioning memory, mythological, socio-political narratives and personal histories, her work examines the divide between fiction and reality and the cycles inherent to History. Baladi won the first prize (Grand Nile Award) at the Cairo Biennale in 2008-09 for her ephemeral construction and sound installation Borg El Amal (Arabic, The Tower of Hope).

For more than twenty years, Baladi has been on the Board of two of the most influential institutions in the Middle East, the Arab Image Foundation in Lebanon, and the Townhouse Gallery of Contemporary Art in Egypt. In 2020, she joined the Board of directors of The Artists Sanctum, a cultural initiative supporting artists whose work contributes to social change. In 2015, she was the Ida Ely Artist in Residence at MIT/CAST. Since 2015, she has been a Lecturer in MIT’s Program in Art, Culture, and Technology (Massachusetts Institute of Technology). In 2006, Baladi founded the artist residency Fenenin el Rehal (Arabic, Nomadic Artists) in Egypt’s White Desert.

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Dan Flavin

Dan Flavin (1933 – 1996) studied for the priesthood for a brief period of time before enlisting in the United States Air Force. Upon his return to New York he studied art history at the New School for Social Research and took drawing and painting classes at Columbia University.

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Dan Flavin: Untitled (To Sabine and Holger), 1966 – 1971

Untitled (to Sabine & Holger) (1966) comprises four red eight-foot fixtures forming a square, placed in a room framing the crevice of the corner. The horizontal fixtures face the viewer, throwing light into the room, while the vertical fixtures face the wall, bouncing light back into the room. As art historian Tiffany Bell noted, the square or rectangular configuration of the lights also allowed Flavin to refer to the picture plane of painting and the idea of perspective, and thus inscribe his work within long-established art-historical categories.
                    [post_title] => Untitled (To Sabine and Holger), 1966 – 1971
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                    [post_name] => untitled-to-sabine-and-holger-1966-1971
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                    [description] => Dan Flavin, American, b. 1933-1966, Untitled (to Sabine and Holger), 1966. Red fluorescent light, 243.8 x 243.8 cm, across a corner. Peder Bonnier, Inc. © 2021 Stephen Flavin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, Dan Flavin Photo: Charles Duprat Courtesy Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, London Paris © Adagp, Paris, 2020
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Dan Flavin (1933 - 1996) studied for the priesthood for a brief period of time before enlisting in the United States Air Force. During military service in 1954–55, he studied art through the University of Maryland Extension Program in Korea. Upon his return to New York in 1956, he briefly attended the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts and studied art history at the New School for Social Research. In 1959, he took drawing and painting classes at Columbia University.

Major retrospectives of Flavin’s work have been organised by National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC (2004, which travelled to Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Hayward Gallery, London, Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich, and Los Angeles County Museum of Art, through to 2007); Dia Foundation for the Arts (2004); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1992) among others. Flavin has participated in numerous group shows, including The Illusion of Light, Palazzo Grassi, Venice (2014); Color Chart: Reinventing Color, 1950 to Today, Museum of Modern Art, New York, and Tate Liverpool (2008) and more. Permanent installations of Flavin’s work can be seen in numerous museum collections throughout the world.

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Nancy Holt

Nancy Holt (1938 – 2014) is known for her earthworks, public sculpture and installation work. Best known for her large-scale environmental works, her public sculptures are permanently installed in locations across Europe and North America.

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Nancy Holt: Holes of Light, 1973

Holes of Light (1973), profound in scale and rigorous in calculation, projects light through circular holes that investigate principles of directionality and shadow. It invites the viewer to circumvent a bisected room activated by shifting intervals of illumination and darkness. The 609.60-cm-wide space is divided lengthwise by a hanging partition wall perforated with a diagonal row of eight 25.4-cm-diameter circular holes. Mounted lights installed on facing walls alternate on and off, shifting light from side to side every 30 seconds. As projected light intersects the dark side of the space, 50.8-cm-diameter ellipses are cast, forming an extended diagonal along the wall. Meanwhile, bright light illuminates the partition’s other side, revealing pencil-traced ellipses on the wall, marking the transitory play of light and shadow. When looking through the partition wall from the lit side, one full circle of light can be seen on the opposite wall, whereas the remaining circles become a graduated sequence of crescents. The circle in Holt’s work conversely frames both presence and emptiness. It references the earth, sun, moon, and human eye, embracing Holt’s emphatic perceptual philosophy as defined by focus, light, and space.

 

 
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                    [description] => Nancy Holt, Holes of Light, 1973, Partition wall perforated with circles and electric light. Dimensions variable. Courtesy Dia Art Foundation with support from Holt-Smithson Foundation. Photo © Riyadh Art 2021
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Nancy Holt (1938 – 2014) grew up in New Jersey and graduated from Tufts University, where she majored in biology. Holt is known for her earthworks, public sculpture and installation work. Best known for her large-scale environmental works Sun Tunnel (1973–76, Great Basin Desert, Utah) and Dark Star Park (1970–84, Arlington County, Virginia) her public sculptures are permanently installed in locations across Europe and North America.

In 2010-12 the retrospective exhibition Nancy Holt: Sightlines travelled from Wallach Art Gallery, Columbia University, New York to venues in Boston, Chicago, Karlsruhe, Salt Lake City, and Santa Fe, accompanied by a monograph by Alena J Williams (University of California Press). Other notable exhibitions include Nancy Holt: Points of View, Parafin, London (2020), Dia Art Foundation, New York (2018); Nancy Holt: Land Art, Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester (2013); and Nancy Holt: Selected Film and Photo Works, Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver (2013). Her work has been included in major survey exhibitions including Ends of the Earth: Land Art to 1974 at Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and Haus der Kunst, Munich (2012-13), and Light Show at Hayward Gallery, London (2013). In 2018 Sun Tunnels and Holes of Light (1973) were acquired by Dia Art Foundation, with the support of Holt/Smithson Foundation.

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Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer (b. 1967) develops participatory installations at the intersection of architecture and performance art with a particular interest in radical empiricism and critical social practice.

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                    [post_content] => Recurrent Anaximander (2020) is named after Anaximander of Miletus (610-545 BC), the pre-Socratic philosopher who advanced that the stars and planets were not located within a celestial vault. Instead, Anaximander postulated that they appear in a continuous space surrounding the Earth, furthering our understanding of the mechanism of eclipses that occur between the stars and planets. Building on Anaximander’s theory, Lozano-Hemmer’s artwork is a generative animation running on a custom-made 400,000-pixel circular display that shows small planets in orbit creating rare eclipses. Each day it is on exhibit, the piece connects to a server housed at NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), downloading the sun's most recent images. These images are randomly integrated with mathematical generative algorithms such as reaction-diffusion and equations such as Navier-Stokes (that describe the physics of nature) and Voronoi (partitions of a plane in a region close to a given set of objects). The algorithms produce an infinite rotation of images so that the viewer never sees the same image twice. 
                    [post_title] => Recurrent Anaximander, 2020
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                    [description] => Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Mexican–Canadian, b. 1967, Recurrent Anaximander, 2020. Custom LED display, steel, aluminum, glass, circuits, PC running custom software, and internet connection 200 x 200 x 18 cm. Courtesy the artist and Superblue © Rafael Lozano Hemmer. Photo: Antimodular
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        )

    [artists_detailed_description] => 

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer (b. 1967) develops participatory installations at the intersection of architecture and performance art with a particular interest in radical empiricism and critical social practice. Pushing public engagement to its limits, many Lozano-Hemmer works are activated with viewers’ biometric data such as their heart rate, breath, voice and fingerprints, measured in real-time through sensors, cameras and microphones. Lozano-Hemmer was the first artist to represent Mexico at the Venice Biennial in 2017. He received the title of Compagnon des arts et des lettres du Québec (2016), the Governor General’s Award in Visual and Media Arts (2015) and two BAFTA British Academy Awards for Interactive Art (2002, 2003), among others.

Notable projects include Border Tuner (2019), which connected communities across the US/Mexico border with interactive light “bridges” that enabled conversations between participants on either side; Cloud Display (2019), a voice-recognition fountain that writes texts in midair using cold water vapour; and Solar Equation (2010), a faithful simulation of the turbulence at the surface of the sun projected on the world’s largest spherical aerostat, flying over Federation Square in Melbourne. His work is featured in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, SFMOMA in San Francisco, MUAC in Mexico City, and the Tate in London.

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